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Mark Goldberg '79
Induction Class of 2007

A native of Lawrence, N.Y., Mark Goldberg played tennis at Binghamton from 1975-79. He earned his bachelor's degree in philosophy in 1979 and went on to earn his law degree from Benjamin Cardozo School of Law in 1983.

Goldberg was the No. 1 player for a Binghamton team that went 46-5 and was nationally ranked three years during his tenure. Twice, Goldberg-led squads finished among the top 10 teams in the country. He advanced to the NCAA Championship in each of his final three collegiate seasons and holds the school record for highest career singles win percentage (84%).

As a freshman, Goldberg went undefeated at No. 3 singles, helping the team engineer a 10-1 record and runnerup finish at the SUNYAC Championship.

In his second year, Goldberg took over at No. 1 and posted a 12-3 singles record. He also captured the No. 1 doubles title at the conference championship — the first of two SUNYAC crowns. Goldberg advanced to the NCAA Championship in doubles and helped the team place eighth in the country.

In 1977-78, he lost just once in 21 matches, steering Binghamton to a 12-1 record, a first-ever SUNYAC team title and a second straight top 10 national ranking.

As a senior, Goldberg and his teammates captured a second straight conference title and produced a third straight 12-win season. He qualified for the NCAA Championship in Jackson, Mississippi, where he advanced to the round of 16 in singles — the equivalent of All-America status in the current structure. Unseeded in the field of 64, Goldberg won two matches, including an upset of the tournament's No. 4 seed. His points enabled Binghamton to place 13th in the country.

After graduation, he continued to earn national distinction in adult age-group competition, including a top 20 USTA ranking for Men 40 and under.
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