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Billings sets career block record
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Seven-foot sophomore center Nick Billings (Kodiak, Alaska) recently broke the school's career record for blocked shots. Against St. Francis (N.Y.) on January 7th, Billings surpassed Jeff Merrill's (1990-94) record of 126 blocks in just his 33rd collegiate game. He finished the game with a season-high eight rejections, raising his career total to 130. As a freshman last season, Billings set the school's single-season record with 80 blocks, despite missing the final seven games of the season. He had a career-high nine blocks against Colgate on January 28, setting a school single-game record in the process. Billings has had at least seven blocks in a game on five separate occasions and has swatted at least six shots nine times.

"Nick is a great young player and he can play at a very high level," said BU coach Al Walker. "Our team defense is obviously much better with him in the lineup."

Billings has been among the national leaders in blocks ever since arriving at Binghamton. As a freshman, he ranked sixth in the nation with 3.81 blocks per game. This season, he was averaging 4.17 rejections per game, a figure that ranked third in the country through games of January 6. Billings leads the America East Conference in blocks and is also seventh in rebounding (6.3/game).
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