Releases

For Immediate Release: September 23, 2009
Contact: David O'Brian (dobrian@binghamton.edu)
Phone: 607-777-6478

Binghamton men's soccer blanks Cornell 2-0

Box Score

ITHACA, N.Y.-- Senior back Kyle Kucharski and sophomore forward Andy Tiedt each scored a goal and senior goalkeeper Jason Stenta stopped a penalty kick, leading Binghamton (4-3-0) to a 2-0 win at Cornell (3-3-1) in a non-conference men's soccer game on Wednesday night at Berman Field. The victory marked the second straight shutout for the Bearcats.

"I thought we responded magnificently to the physical challenge that was presented in front of us by Cornell," head coach Paul Marco said. "They were up for the match, they covered a lot of ground and were winning challenges at the midfield."

Kucharski opened the scoring 12:27 into the game when he converted a free kick from 25 yards out. It was his first collegiate goal and gives him a team-best six total points for the season.

Stenta, meanwhile, faced off against Cornell's Scott Caldwell on a penalty kick at the 17:27 mark. Caldwell kept the ball on the ground and fired it towards the left corner of the goal. Stenta guessed perfectly and batted the ball away. The rebound was shot wide by Matt Bouraee.

Tiedt gave the Bearcats breathing room when he scored off a throw in by freshman back Matt Robertson at the 70:40 mark. He is now tied for the team lead with two goals so far this year.

Cornell outshot Binghamton 14-8, including 10-5 in the opening half. Stenta, however, made seven saves to extend his program record to 34 career shutouts.

Binghamton returns home to face Niagara on Sunday at 3 p.m.

NOTES: The penalty kick by Caldwell was the first against Binghamton since Jamie Johnson of Boston converted his attempt during the 2004 America East championship game. Stenta's save was the first recorded by a Binghamton goalkeeper on a penalty kick since the Bearcats moved up to the NCAA Division I level in 2001.

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