Releases

For Immediate Release: December 2, 2008
Contact: David O'Brian (dobrian@binghamton.edu)
Phone: 607-777-6478

Binghamton men's soccer posts nation's highest NCAA Division I team GPA in 2007-08

VESTAL, N.Y. -- The Binghamton men's soccer team, which has advanced to the past six America East Conference championship games, posted the highest team GPA among over 200 NCAA Division I programs during the 2007-08 academic year. The results were posted by the NSCAA.

The Bearcats attained a cumulative GPA of 3.37 in 2007-08, their highest ever as a Division I program. Among Division I schools, the Bearcats finished ahead of second-place Dartmouth (3.34), which was the top Division I school last season.

"Binghamton University is very proud of the efforts of Coach Paul Marco and our men's soccer team," Director of Athletics Dr. Joel Thirer said. "In addition to being one of our consistently most competitive athletic programs, our men's soccer team has combined that athletic success with their commitment in the classroom. They set a high standard for all of our teams, as well as for the young people in our community, as to what being a student-athlete means."

"This honor is a testament to all of the hard work our players have put into our program," head coach Paul Marco said. "They have set a standard of excellence and been successful in every way."

The 2007-08 academic year marks the third consecutive time that the Bearcats have ranked among the top four Division I programs in the nation in terms of their overall GPA. During 2006-07, Binghamton was fourth with a 3.26 GPA and the preceding year, it was third with a 3.30 team GPA.

This past season,
Binghamton finished 12-6-3 and set the America East record by advancing to its sixth straight title game. The Bearcats have won the 2003 and 2006 conference championships as well as the 2006 and 2007 regular season crowns.

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