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For Immediate Release: February 19, 2010
Contact: Terrence Lollie (sports@binghamton.edu)
Phone: 607-777-2956

BU swimming & diving crowns three champions on day three of America East Championships
Ciccone, Perez-Rogers and Slesnick all claim first-place finishes

Results

GERMANTOWN, M.D. -- On day three of the America East Swimming and Diving Championships, Binghamton crowned its first champions of the four-day event. Juniors Joe Perez-Rogers and Nolan Slesnick each touched first for the men, while senior Amanda Ciccone swam to a first place finish for the women. At the end of day three, the men remained in third place while the women dropped to fifth.

"We had one of the best days of competition in our history," head coach Sean Clark said. "Everyone really put their hearts out there and I thought we put a show on for our fans...I'm kind of speechless from the day we had."

The Binghamton men started the day off strong as four Bearcats scored points in the 400 IM, led by Slesnick's first-place finish in a time of 3:56.28. Sophomore Josh Saccurato claimed third (3:58.83), earning all-conference honors and his second finalist showing of the championships. Slesnick, the 2009 America East 400 IM champion was the first Bearcat of the day to secure a victory. Freshman Colin Figus claimed eighth place (4:04.42) giving him two finalist finishes of the championships. Sophomore Aaron Budner scored points for BU by claiming 12th place and consolation finalist honors.

"Nolan (Slesnick) really made a statement out there today," Clark continued. "Placing three guys in the finals was stellar and they all had oustanding swims."

Joe Perez-Rogers blazed to a first-place finish in the 100 back, breaking the conference and meet records in the process. Perez-Rogers' time of 49.07 broke Stony Brook's Ivan Kopas' records of 49.58 and 49.29. Senior Kevin Kearney also swam to a finalist finish, taking eighth with a time of 52.12. Sophomore Mark Cereste and freshmen Ed Hausmann and Winston Chiang all claimed consolation finalist honors, giving BU five point-scorers in the event.

The Binghamton men received another impressive day from seniors Jason Chen and Phil Dzieniszewski. Dzieniszewski cruised to a second-place finish in the 100 breast with a new school record time of 56.12, earning him all-conference recognition. Kyle Ernst of Boston University won the race with a time of 55.14. Sophomores Tim Cabasino and Andrew Ellman had strong swims in the 100 breast with Cabasino finishing eighth (57.48) and Ellman 15th (1.00.10). Chen claimed his second top-three finish of the championships, taking third in the 100 fly with a time of 48.61. Senior Ziyad Rouhana and Hausmann both secured consolations finalist honors for BU.

In the 200 free Binghamton had two swimmers scored points. Junior Dan Feeley swam to a sixth place finish (1:43.15), while sophomore Devon Byrt won the consolation final with a time of 1:43.13. The men closed out their day with a record-setting performance in the 400 medley relay. The quartet of Perez-Rogers, Dzieniszewski, Chen and Cabasino swam to a second-place finish with a time of 3:18.54, the four-year old record by more than two seconds.

On the boards for the Bearcat men, sophomore Anthony Foiles garnered his second straight all-conference honors, placing third in the three-meter dive. Justin Mattison finished eighth with a total scored of 420.35, earning finalist recognition.

The women were led by Amanda Ciccone's first-place swim in the 100 fly. Ciccone out-touched reigning America East Female Most Outstanding Swimmer, New Hampshire's Amy Perrault, with a time of 54.99. Ciccone is the first BU women's champion since Hui Jue Cai won the 50 and 100 free in 2005. Senior Brittany Detlef earned finalist honors by touching fifth in the event with a time of 56.44.

"Amanda (Ciccone) had the swim of her life," Clark stated. "She's been a force for us all season and its a great reward for her."

Sophomore Tiffany Siu had another all-conference worthy day by placing second in the 400 IM. Siu broke her own school record with a time of 4:21.69, finishing almost three seconds behind the winner, Jenni Kotonias of UMBC. Junior Tricia Alejandro brought home consolation finalist recognition, touching 16th in the event.

Freshman Lauren Flower swam to finalist honors in the 100 breast, claiming eighth place with a time of 1:05.63. In the preliminaries, she set a new school record with a time of 1:05.24. Senior Danielle Gallo had a quality race, finishing 16th to earn consolation finalist honors.

In the 100 back, sophomores Olivia Baczek and Melissa Lindahl along with Detlef all claimed consolation finalist honors. Baczek took 10th (58.10), Detlef, 11th (58.50) and Lindahl 16th (59.75) to scored much needed points for the Bearcats. The women finished their day by setting a new school record in the 400 medley relay. The foursome of Baczek, Flower, Siu and Ciccone broke the eight-year old record by more than two seconds with a time of 3:50.18.

After day three of competition, the men remain in third place with 496 points behind UMBC (606) and Boston University (580). The women dropped down to fifth with 262 points just 21 behind Vermont. The UMBC women lead the standings with 520 points.

"It's almost a dream, our hard work this year is really paying off," Clark summarized. "I thought we did all we could do and the team continued to blossom throughout the day. We're really enjoying the experience, but its not over, we have one more day and we need to deliver."

Sunday is the final day of competition, beginning with session six at 10 a.m. Tomorrow's events include the men's and women's 1650 free, 200 back, 100 free, 200 breast, 200 fly and 400 free relay as well as the women's meter dive.

 Women's Team Rankings
1. UMBC 520
2. Boston Univ. 424
3. New Hampshire 387
4. Vermont 283
5. Binghamton 262
6. Stony Brook 212
7. Maine 163
   
Men's Team Rankings   
1. UMBC 606
2. Boston Univ. 580
3. Binghamton  496
4. Stony Brook 238
5. Maine   230

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